“Minds, Bodies, and Souls” is an end of the year exhibition showcasing TANA intern posters with students from the silkscreen printing program in the Chicana/o Studies Department at UC Davis.  Their exciting work represents various styles, techniques, and innovative approaches explored through the silkscreen process.

TANA workshop participants will additionally have posters on display and for sale. The Open House will offers a unique opportunity to connect with the artists and gain an understanding of their process, artistic point of view, and why the poster serves as a vehicle for change and continues to make a difference!

 

Opening:

Friday, June 7   5-7pm

Dates:

Through September 13, 2019

Event Details:

*Workshop participant,

Intern, & Chi Silkscreen artist work on display

*Live DJ

*Taco Truck Y Elotera

*Refreshments

 

Location:

Taller Arte del Nuevo Amanecer

1224 Lemen Ave. Woodland, CA

(530) 402-1065

 

Artists:

Jose Quintero

Marina Contreras

Wendy Hernandez

Gabriel Mata

Sheila Moreno

Jose De Jesus Quintero: Jose De Jesus Quintero born and raised in Woodland, CA. He is graduating from UC Davis with a double major in Chicanx Studies and Art Studio. Jose went to Woodland Community College where he was first introduced to TANA in 2015. Starting Fall of 2017 he was accepted to UC Davis and began his internship at TANA. Creating art, particularly with and for a cause took off for him. As the process of silkscreen printmaking became second nature, his sensibility of making art for others became a responsibility. His posters are focused on personal experience with limitations, distance, and self-care. Hoping that his imagery may inspire the community and others to tackle issues that are close to home. While serving as an intern, Jose realized the community of Woodland needs spaces like TANA; an outlet and hub for activists, as well as a space for freedom of expression.

Marina Contreras: Marina Contreras grew up in a small border town, Calexico, CA. and its sister city, Mexicali, BC, Mexico. Now a second year studying Clinical Nutrition and Chicanx Studies at UC Davis. She originally began her artistic work through acrylic paintings on canvas, and later developed the process of screen printing where she is now focused on creating posters that express issues she sees in her community. She creates thoughtful images about current issues with the expressed intention of generating hope in each topic and spark conversations that move toward a solution.

Gabriel Mata: Gabriel Mata (pronouns:they/she/he) grew up in the San Fernando Valley north of Los Angeles, CA. Graduating with a B.A. in Chicana/o Studies from UC Davis they hope to work within community spaces to address the pervasive cissexism and heterosexism within Latinidad. Throughout their time at Davis, they witnessed cissexism and heterosexism perpetuated by professors, students, organizations, and the Chicana/o department. Therefore they seek to highlight issues created through colonialist ideologies within the Chicanx and Latinx community. Through their position as the Gran Tardeada coordinator, they choose to center queer and trans identities for the 50th anniversary and created the “Queer and Trans Latinidad” gallery in commemoration of queer and trans labor towards a better environment for the Latinx community at UC Davis. Their art is centered around their experiences of having both queer and trans identities and navigating ethnic spaces designated for Latinidad. Their hope is to create pieces that spark dialogue that goes beyond the university and back to the communities the students originate from.

Sheila Moreno: Sheila Moreno (pronouns: they/them) grew up in K-Town Los Angeles, CA. They are now a third year at UC Davis, double majoring in Art Studio and Chicanx Studies. In high school, Sheila began their artistic work with drawing, and acrylic painting. Later in college, they were introduced to three forms of printing; silkscreen, woodblock, and intaglio. Through these mediums, their work centers around the cultural aspects and social issues that are part of their upbringing and are seen in their community today. They also work from personal experience.Given the skills to work with almost any medium (painting, drawing, printing), they have put their responsibility in creating a change in different forms of art. Sheila’s goal is to continue working with their community and creating art that their community wants to see and can connect with. To them, there is no better way of learning then through the beauty of art.

Wendy Hernandez: Wendy Hernandez is a fourth year Animal Science and Chicanx Studies double major from UC Davis. She is from South Central Los Angeles, California. Wendy was introduced to silkscreen printing through the Chicanx Studies department during the Summer of 2018. Starting Fall of 2018, she began her internship at TANA (Taller Arte del Nuevo Amanecer). Wendy’s work focuses on sharing the narratives of the working class population of Los Angeles. The collection of stories from her family and community have allowed her to advocate for a better immigration reform, among other issues which affect a broader population.