Stephany Sanchez: Guerrera

Opening Reception: Friday, December 6, 5-7pm

Dates: December 6, 2019 – February 21, 2020 

Hours: Tuesday – Thursday 2-6pm
Fridays by appointment (530-402-1065)
Saturday 1-4pm
*Holiday Hours: December 20 – January 7, 2020 by appointment.

Join us Friday, December 6, 5-7pm for an opening reception featuring the work of Stephany Sanchez, a Oaxacan-American artist who’s woodblock prints compellingly address political views, pay homage to her culture, and use Oaxacan folk art as an influence. The exciting evening event will include music, refreshments, live-woodblock printing, and available prints for sale by Stephany Sanchez.

 

Biography

Stephany Sanchez is a Oaxacan- American artist from San Jose, California, currently residing in San Francisco. Through her work, she addresses political views and pays homage to her culture using Oaxacan folk art as an influence. Stephany enjoys working with a variety of mediums, printmaking being her current focus. She is currently working towards her Studio Practice degree at San Francisco State University with an emphasis in printmaking.

Guerrera: An Exchange with Stephanie Sanchez 

TANA: Can you share a bit about your background?

Stephany Sanchez: My father was born in Oaxaca and my mother was born in Guerrero but raised in Oaxaca. My brothers and I were born in the United States but have traveled to Oaxaca since we were less than a year old. We spent much of our childhood in Oaxaca, completing one year of schooling and taking yearly summer trips to ensure we could read and write in Spanish. During that time we would run around with my primos in my father’s small pueblo. Our family would take us out to visit places that they felt were important for us to appreciate. These trips taught us a lot about our ancestry and culture of Oaxaca.

 

TANA: What are some of your sources of inspiration?

Stephany Sanchez: Much of my inspiration stems from Oaxacan folk art, artesanías, and archeological sites. Apart from these, I find much inspiration in Mexican history. Moreover, I really enjoy studying the Mexican Revolution. I find it helpful to read into labor movements of the time and political topics still relevant today. I find myself seeking information about how these movements influence Mexican art, specifically printmaking.

 

TANA: Who are your biggest influences?

Stephany Sanchez: My art is highly influenced by 19th-century, Mexican photographers. I can alleviate any art block by looking at the photographs of artists Lola Alvares Bravo, Graciela Iturbide, Nacho Lopez, and Victor Casasola. I am also influenced by artists like Saturnino Herran, Jose Clemente Orozco, Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, and Francisco Goita. Lastly, family photographs sent from relatives in Oaxaca highly influence my work. Family portraits and candids, shared through our Facebook group chat, often display my family in their everyday pueblo life or enjoying cultural festivities. 

 

TANA: What does your work aim to say?

Stephany Sanchez: My work is intended to create representation for Oaxacan women and anyone else that can connect to my art. I seek to create relatable content for people like me. Having come from Oaxacan ancestry, I never felt represented in media or art. I want my work to serve as a platform for me to express my experience and stance on our current political climate as a woman of color. 

 

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Ricardo Flores Magon   Woodcut print,   18” x 24”,  2018

 

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Muerteada, Woodblock Print, 32″x28″, 2018

 

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Riot    Woodblock print,   22” x 30”,   2017